Beautiful Knitting

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Posts Tagged ‘gauge’

Sock Madness pattern variations

Posted by mtmom on May 9, 2008

godmother's socks toe

I’ve been saving this to publish after my Godmother’s Sock pattern is released to the Sock Madness competitors.  Friday, 9 May is the Big Day, so here it is:  ways to get bigger socks from my 64-stitch pattern.  (And several semi-random pent up sock photos!  :-))

Variation 1:  Change width by changing gauge.

The original pattern was worked at 8.5 sts/inch in stockinette, and fits a foot from 8″-9″ around (my own knuckle-width and instep-width).

If, however you use yarn and needles that give you a different gauge, the same 64 stitches in the pattern will yield a different circumference to your finished sock and that sock will then fit a different size of foot.  You can then add or leave out rounds of length, to fit.  It’s the width that takes some arithmetic to figure.  Here’s a table of possible gauges (measured in stitches per inch over stockinette) matched with foot sizes (measured in inches around the widest part of the foot).  The sock will be much more snug on the upper end of each width range.

 

Gauge (sts/in) Foot circumference – min  – max
4.5 15.11 17.00
4.75 14.32 16.11
5 13.60 15.30
5.25 12.95 14.57
5.5 12.36 13.91
5.75 11.83 13.30
6 11.33 12.75
6.25 10.88 12.24
6.5 10.46 11.77
6.75 10.07 11.33
7 9.71 10.93
7.25 9.38 10.55
7.5 9.07 10.20
7.75 8.77 9.87
8 8.50 9.56
8.25 8.24 9.27
8.5 8.00 9.00
8.75 7.77 8.74
9 7.56 8.50
9.25 7.35 8.27
9.5 7.16 8.05
9.75 6.97 7.85
10 6.80 7.65

 

Please keep in mind that, although these measurements look oh-so-very accurate with all those decimal places, that’s just because I got them from the calculator.  They are still just as approximate as the 8″ – 9″ measurement of my own foot with which I started.

ankle back  begin edging

Variation 2:  Changing width by changing stitch-count.

The original pattern uses 64 stitches.

68 stitches.

Same cast-on.  Same beginning of ribbing pattern, but you’ll end up on round 21 with k3, p1, …, p1,k2 on the instep needle, and 34 plain stitches on the sole.  Same heel, but on 34 vs 32 stitches.  For the ankle, the ribbing on the rear needle will begin with k1, p1, k to last st, p1 for 4 rounds; then k1, p1, (k3, p1), k23, (p1, k3), p1 for 5 rounds; then k1, p1, (k3, p1)x2, k15, (p1, k3)x2, p1 for 6 rounds; then k1, p1, (k3, p1)x3, k7, (p1, k3)x3, p1 for 7 rounds; then k1, p1, (k3, p1)x8 for the remaining 3″ of ankle, about 30 more rounds.  Instep needle and sole needle will not begin in same place in the 3-1 rhythm, but should flow together to be 3-1 all around: instep ends with k2, sole begins with k1;  sole ends with p1, instep begins with k3.  When you get to the cuff, alter the joining rhythm as follows: instead of slipping 3 stitches and SSSK-ing whenever you come to a last-purl-stitch, you must occasionally slip only 2 stitches and SSK, as if they were “normal”:  slip only 2 once somewhere in the middle of the back needle and once more somewhere on the front needle (note that this does not count the very first join, where you slipped only 2 eventhough it was a last-purl).  This rhythm should make your lace and sock both come out evenly and finish at the same time.  Same cuff grafting.

72 stitches.

 Same cast-on.  Begin foot ribbing on round 6 (an even rd with 36 sts): k1,p1, (k3,p1)x4 on the 18 sts on instep needle; plain stockinette on sole.  Continue adding stitches “in pattern” to foot, ending up on rd 23 with k2, p1, (k3, p1) x8, k1 over the 36 sts on the instep needle.  Same heel technique, but on 36 vs 32 stitches.  For the ankle, begin the rear ribbing with k2, p1, k across to last 2 sts, p1, k1 on the heel/sole needle; same for 4 rds.  Then k2, p1, (k3, p1), k23 , (p1, k3), p1, k1 for 5 rounds.  Then k2, p1, (k3, p1)x2, k15, (p1, k3)x2, p1, k1 for 6 rounds.  Then k2, p1, (k3, p1)x3, k7, (p1, k3)x3, p1, k1 for 7 rounds.  Then k2, p1, (k3, p1)x8, k1 for the rest of the ankle, about 30 more rounds.  Note that instep and sole needle (should) have the same arrangement of stitches, beginning with k2 and ending with k1, for a smooth rhythm of 3-1 all around sock.  When you get to the cuff, alter the joining rhythm as follow:  the very first join you do is a normal slip 2 SSK, but the second one is a last-purl-before-a-knit stich and, unlike the original pattern, you will make this a slip 3 SSSK like the other last-purls.  This should have your sock cuff and lace cuff finish evenly.  Same cuff grafting.

cuff joining joining cuff 

I truly hope you enjoy knitting these socks, original or varied, and are pleased with your results.  I look forward to seeing some photos!

Your SM2 round 6 sock E designer,
Deborah (Mt. Mom) Swift

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A Tale of Two Gauges

Posted by mtmom on March 4, 2008

Did you miss me?  I had 2 sick girls in the house, and then came down with cough, aches, and fever myself.  Haven’t felt up to writing — sure you understand.  Thanks for coming back to read today!

While I have been ill, and eagerly awaiting the next installment of TECHKnitter‘s 8-Trick Hat Knitalong,  (BTW, here’s how mine looks after completing the first stripe:  1st band of 8-trick hat  Happy!). . .

. . . I worked on my knee socks.  See the nice increases fanning out from the center back of the lower calf?  back of calf inc line 

(the coilless safety pins mark increments of 10 rounds, for ease of later counting)

After working the same number of rounds on the second sock calf as on the first, I began the decreases for the calf-top and then paused to try them on.  Something was fishy. . . .  trying on the 2 knee socks 

I should be ready to start the blue ribbing, but. . . .  Do you see a bit of a discrepancy in the height of those 2 socks?!  [My teen-genius ds says they lack “gauge symmetry” and that that’s a physics joke.  He turned quite red laughing.  Ah, well.]

I ripped back to the last increases and added another pair.  Unfortunately, the having-been-ripped (what kind of past-participle is that?) yarn was less full and springy, and my stitches continued to be a bit skimpy.  I’m hoping the eventual washing will make things better and not worse.

So now, I’m going by inches instead of by round-count.

And look, I’m nearly done (again)!  2 cuffs 

And my tensioning finger — I use the left forefinger for most of the action — is sore.  Taking it a bit easier for a while.

Posted in Design, Socks | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »