Beautiful Knitting

Where Mt.Mom knits, crochets, designs, and seeks Beauty as food for the soul.

Sock Madness pattern variations

Posted by mtmom on May 9, 2008

godmother's socks toe

I’ve been saving this to publish after my Godmother’s Sock pattern is released to the Sock Madness competitors.  Friday, 9 May is the Big Day, so here it is:  ways to get bigger socks from my 64-stitch pattern.  (And several semi-random pent up sock photos!  :-))

Variation 1:  Change width by changing gauge.

The original pattern was worked at 8.5 sts/inch in stockinette, and fits a foot from 8″-9″ around (my own knuckle-width and instep-width).

If, however you use yarn and needles that give you a different gauge, the same 64 stitches in the pattern will yield a different circumference to your finished sock and that sock will then fit a different size of foot.  You can then add or leave out rounds of length, to fit.  It’s the width that takes some arithmetic to figure.  Here’s a table of possible gauges (measured in stitches per inch over stockinette) matched with foot sizes (measured in inches around the widest part of the foot).  The sock will be much more snug on the upper end of each width range.

 

Gauge (sts/in) Foot circumference – min  – max
4.5 15.11 17.00
4.75 14.32 16.11
5 13.60 15.30
5.25 12.95 14.57
5.5 12.36 13.91
5.75 11.83 13.30
6 11.33 12.75
6.25 10.88 12.24
6.5 10.46 11.77
6.75 10.07 11.33
7 9.71 10.93
7.25 9.38 10.55
7.5 9.07 10.20
7.75 8.77 9.87
8 8.50 9.56
8.25 8.24 9.27
8.5 8.00 9.00
8.75 7.77 8.74
9 7.56 8.50
9.25 7.35 8.27
9.5 7.16 8.05
9.75 6.97 7.85
10 6.80 7.65

 

Please keep in mind that, although these measurements look oh-so-very accurate with all those decimal places, that’s just because I got them from the calculator.  They are still just as approximate as the 8″ – 9″ measurement of my own foot with which I started.

ankle back  begin edging

Variation 2:  Changing width by changing stitch-count.

The original pattern uses 64 stitches.

68 stitches.

Same cast-on.  Same beginning of ribbing pattern, but you’ll end up on round 21 with k3, p1, …, p1,k2 on the instep needle, and 34 plain stitches on the sole.  Same heel, but on 34 vs 32 stitches.  For the ankle, the ribbing on the rear needle will begin with k1, p1, k to last st, p1 for 4 rounds; then k1, p1, (k3, p1), k23, (p1, k3), p1 for 5 rounds; then k1, p1, (k3, p1)x2, k15, (p1, k3)x2, p1 for 6 rounds; then k1, p1, (k3, p1)x3, k7, (p1, k3)x3, p1 for 7 rounds; then k1, p1, (k3, p1)x8 for the remaining 3″ of ankle, about 30 more rounds.  Instep needle and sole needle will not begin in same place in the 3-1 rhythm, but should flow together to be 3-1 all around: instep ends with k2, sole begins with k1;  sole ends with p1, instep begins with k3.  When you get to the cuff, alter the joining rhythm as follows: instead of slipping 3 stitches and SSSK-ing whenever you come to a last-purl-stitch, you must occasionally slip only 2 stitches and SSK, as if they were “normal”:  slip only 2 once somewhere in the middle of the back needle and once more somewhere on the front needle (note that this does not count the very first join, where you slipped only 2 eventhough it was a last-purl).  This rhythm should make your lace and sock both come out evenly and finish at the same time.  Same cuff grafting.

72 stitches.

 Same cast-on.  Begin foot ribbing on round 6 (an even rd with 36 sts): k1,p1, (k3,p1)x4 on the 18 sts on instep needle; plain stockinette on sole.  Continue adding stitches “in pattern” to foot, ending up on rd 23 with k2, p1, (k3, p1) x8, k1 over the 36 sts on the instep needle.  Same heel technique, but on 36 vs 32 stitches.  For the ankle, begin the rear ribbing with k2, p1, k across to last 2 sts, p1, k1 on the heel/sole needle; same for 4 rds.  Then k2, p1, (k3, p1), k23 , (p1, k3), p1, k1 for 5 rounds.  Then k2, p1, (k3, p1)x2, k15, (p1, k3)x2, p1, k1 for 6 rounds.  Then k2, p1, (k3, p1)x3, k7, (p1, k3)x3, p1, k1 for 7 rounds.  Then k2, p1, (k3, p1)x8, k1 for the rest of the ankle, about 30 more rounds.  Note that instep and sole needle (should) have the same arrangement of stitches, beginning with k2 and ending with k1, for a smooth rhythm of 3-1 all around sock.  When you get to the cuff, alter the joining rhythm as follow:  the very first join you do is a normal slip 2 SSK, but the second one is a last-purl-before-a-knit stich and, unlike the original pattern, you will make this a slip 3 SSSK like the other last-purls.  This should have your sock cuff and lace cuff finish evenly.  Same cuff grafting.

cuff joining joining cuff 

I truly hope you enjoy knitting these socks, original or varied, and are pleased with your results.  I look forward to seeing some photos!

Your SM2 round 6 sock E designer,
Deborah (Mt. Mom) Swift

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4 Responses to “Sock Madness pattern variations”

  1. Nanette said

    Oh they’re lovely! I really adored rolled cuffs – especially feminine ones like the ones on your socks.

  2. THANK YOU! BRAVO! WAY TO GO… 😉

    Have just finished sock 1 but glad I printed this pattern out on the good paper…keeping it!!

    And the video(s)! Cuff was scary at first but painless and one of the most memorable patterns I’ve done in a while.
    (Still plotting a provisional cast on, top down next time but glad I followed (most) of the directions as written. Easy toe 12 stitch/ 5 rows easily transitioned to your instructions by round 3 😉
    You’ve ALMOST won me over to toe up/short row heels.
    Dedicated DPN cuff down resistor! Resistance is futile?
    Will try the 2nd cuff by transferring stitches to a short circ first and see if that starts off easier.

  3. Lynadell said

    I just love sox! Knitting them is so much fun and so easy to do. Everyone loves to get them wear them and so I have often got a pair on the go. I find that 4 needles are better as you don’t have a seam but even on two needles they are fine and the seam is not really felt after the first wear.

    Having a pair on the go is always a good thing so that if the work that I am doing it too complicated to do when I am talking to others I can put up the sox and carry on. I like to use up odd balls of yarn so that they are colourful though I have made many in one colour too. Everyone loves to get them and wear them as well, and me? Well I am just a continuous knit!

    It is really fine wool that sets my blood going though and my fingers itching. A 2ply yarn can get me going so much that I don’t do anything in the house for days. Luckily I am an extremely fast knitter and this way I can get through garments quickly.

    I am enjoying your blogg very much.

    Lynadell

  4. Was definitely easier transferring to circ from DPN to do the cuff. Although I used Susan Bates brand (only quick option available). JOIN on the needle sucks! Stitches had to be fiddled with to get them back on the needle. A lot! Even so it was way easier than the DPN points of 3 needles holding the sock plus the new working needle.

    Thanks again! My favorite SM2 pattern 🙂

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